Are You Ready To Rock?

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RC4WD Bully II MOA RTR Competition Crawler

Words & Images: Scott ‘AceofAxe’ Curlin & Andy ‘Twinset’ Moore
Available Globally: HERE or in UK: HERE
Current Price: $589.99
Spec
  • CNC Machined Alloy Axles
  • MOA (Motor On Axle)
  • Wheelbase: 317mm
  • Width: 254mm
  • Height: 182mm
  • Ground Clearance: 92mm
  • Final Drive Ratio: 40.7 : 1
  • Weight: 1.99Kg
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The MOA Comp Crawler is back!…Introducing the Bully II

Prologue…

In 2010 while I was on “Holiday” in a very hot and sandy place, a buddy of mine ordered a comp crawler. When it came in he brought it to my attention as he knew I was an RC guy. I was just starting to look at the crawler and scale scene, but was still busy trying to make everything I owned go faster, and survive bigger, and bigger jumps. I was a basher through and through and didn’t have time for any other aspects of the RC car world. Sure, I have always loved racing but didn’t have a proper place to do that at the time. So, I focused on making my bashers faster and stronger. Then he brings this crawler to my attention. At first I was stubborn and said why in the world would you want to crawl when you can jump? But he convinced me to watch him on some rocks we had at work. I was interested in the articulation it had going over the obstacles he ran up and over, and was intrigued with its ability to get over some of the bigger rocks. He then handed me the transmitter and I set off on my first crawl. I was immediately hooked and needed one of my own. So, after that I went inside and started to look into my options. I saw the one he had, but thought I should get something different. I ordered a cheapish RTR and waited, and waited…(It took quite a while to get mail where we were).

Bad Move

By the time it came in I had found something else shiny and had changed my mind on crawlers. But it was there, and I wanted to at least try it. I took it out of the box and immediately noticed a lot of plastic on it. It didn’t look very bulletproof to me. But, I loaded in the batteries and gave it a go. I turned it on, tried driving up a wall and over a few objects, I very quickly decided it needed to go back. I had bought a crawler that looked cool, but couldn’t crawl very well. I boxed it up and sent it back. The car I replaced it with help me to launch my YouTube channel so it wasn’t all bad…but that was it for owning a true crawler for a while.

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Scale has been my thing for a while now…Here I am with Mr Brian parker himself at the 2016 UK RECON G6

Once I returned home, eventually I got into the scale scene and started to regret letting that crawler go, but everything happens for a reason. I bought one other shafty crawler after that, but I quickly converted it to a scale rig and that ended me owning a real crawler once more. I met Peter Gray and the RCCar.Zone (Formerly RRCi) team in 2010 and have been introduced to many other forms of this great hobby and have gained an appreciation for each one. But I always said I want another, true crawler, I felt like I was really missing out on something.

FFWD To 2016

Pete, being the mate he is, remembered my interest in a owning a ‘real’ crawler. He rang me up recently and said he had a RTR that needed to be reviewed. It was even a Motor on Axle (MOA) design, so something I wanted to run even more. Knowing how this aspect of the market had almost disappeared of late, I thought was it was probably a cheaper brand that would be shockingly bad and resemble something from the toy section of your local grocery store. He assured me however it was (and I quote) “Pure Quality” and I should wait before passing judgement…so I did!

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MOA rigs have been neglected for too long, now RC4WD offer us an affordable, complete solution

I turned up to his house a couple weeks later and saw the normal stash of incoming reviews in the hallway. The only crawler I could see was an RC4WD one. This couldn’t be it? Do they even do a Comp crawler anymore? The answer was yes, and it was mine to review! After a quick look at the box I learned a bit more about it. The RC4WD Bully II is a MOA RTR, its the second generation of the Bully MOA rig that Pete himself reviewed many years back, and that he put on the cover of the RRCi Crawler Special he wrote back in the day.

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The dimensions of the rig at a glance…

He was handing me the responsibility of both reviewing this rig, and also trying to help with my ongoing learning curve of all things RC. A MOA is something I had never run before, and learning about its nuances and the very different driving style required would be very interesting.

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Having never owned or run a rig of this calibre…I was intrigued at its abilities

Being MOA it means that each axle drives independently, so they can be Front only driven, rear only driven and by letting the drag brake keep the un driven axle locked up completely, they act as a front or rear dig. All this functionality can be easily controlled with the included 3-channel transmitter. As a one box solution its a great way onto MOA rigs and much cheaper than actually buying the components separately and building your own. I couldn’t wait to get this home and get it out of the box!

The Box Art Sets The Scene

Once I got back home, I took the box into the office and immediately opened it. But not before truly admiring the box art. The picture on the box is a great shot of the Bully II on the rocks. It truly inspires you to get it out of the box and on to the rocks as soon as! When you see this box in store with all the other boxes, it completely stands out. A lot of other companies have static pictures of their kits. Whether sat in a black background or on a track somewhere. But this shows it in its natural environment and truly makes you want to discover new lands with it! On the side of the box there are listed some of the official RC4WD hop ups for it, and even more great photos of it on the rocks! The exterior of the box is just loaded with Hi-res pics that make you want to charge a battery and hit the rocks!

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Great Promo Images from RC4WD…they make me want to hit the rocks straight away!

Once open, the rig comes out on a sliding cardboard stand as most of us are used to. The transmitter is securely fastened beneath the rig and inset into the base. The manual and spare parts are located under the cardboard base. The manual is a picture based manual, as we have come to know and love from RC4WD. The spares contain a battery strap, optional springs for the shocks and some flat bits of Lexan. I was wondering what the Lexan was for until I noticed they were body panels. These are easily attached to the Bully if you want to add a bit of colour to it. They are also ready to be painted with a protective sheeting on one side just like the normal shells you are used to. I opted to paint mine red as a contrast to my normal Blue?Green I tend use on everything I race.

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Note the elongated Delrin skid and high clearance Titanium links

The transmitter was one of the biggest surprises for me. It’s the new XR4 4 channel radio. I have never had a RTR radio with 10 model memory! You can buy relatively cheap receivers for your other kits and control them with this radio!

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10 Model memory, LCD Screen, 3-Channel…great spec for a RTR 2.4Ghz TX

The radio has all the trimmings (see what I did there) that you will find on the high dollar competitors. It also allows you to name each model with its 3-digit display. For this one I named it MOA, that way I know which rig is on memory one. There’s a backlit LED display screen that makes selecting all the functions a dream. But enough about the transmitter let’s talk about the Bully II!

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Articulation is the keyword in Crawling…and the Bully II has it, and then some!

Serious Stuff

Straight away the high clearance lower arms let you know this is a serious comp rig! The carbon fibre Twin Vertical Plates (TVP) look almost as good as they perform! When you want light weight and strength, it’s hard to beat Carbon Fibre! The twin Boost 35t rebuildable motors are exactly what I would put on a crawler kit if I was building one, so that was a nice choice by RC4WD, in my case at least.

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The included 6V 5A Turbo BEC is fine for the supplied steering servo, but go any higher spec and you will need to upgrade

The 6v – 5 Amp BEC is a great choice as well! I run one of those on my RC4WD Beast II and it performs flawlessly! The RC4WD Outcry Brushed Speed Controller with built-in drag brake is the perfect speedo for this rig and simply gets the job done!

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The twin motor ESC allows you to drive each axle independently, so front and rear dig functions are possible

When coupled with the included Rocker Electronic Dig/ESCit proves to be an almost unstoppable combination! The servo is the Twister Metal Gear Digital Servo that is rated at 153oz @ 6v. It seems kind of low for a comp crawler, but it is a RTR and it must work or it wouldn’t be in the kit. But the rocks will reveal all!

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The classic COG test of any comp rig…Not amazingly scientific, but looks coll nevertheless

The only thing I did notice on the Bully was the routing of the motor wires. The front motor wires ran down the lower links and attached to the bottom of the motor. I was a bit concerned as I knew these areas were very open to abuse from the rocks. I quickly re-routed them and plugged the motor wires into the top plugs out of the way. But enough of all this tech talk it’s time to hit the rocks.

I headed up to Derbyshire for our RCCar.Zone Scaler Nationals. I took along the Bully and was planning on testing it at our comp site in Bracken rocks. The night before we were at John Wasley’s house having a drink or more and they all got talking about the glory days of comp crawlers and how I had missed it. They knew I had the Bully with me and were basically setting me up for a trial run on John’s rock garden course. I immediately agreed and we were off to the garden…well I say immediately, I needed to find a suitable 2S LiPo first to fit on the tiny plinth on the front axle, next to the steering servo.

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the steering servo sits on the front axle and is offset to allow a small LiPo to be placed next to it
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Note that rear clearance. Thats why its important to tuck away those motor wires to avoid them being damaged

I was the first one to drive it of course, and I was really enjoying it. John along with Twinset and Pete were giving me tips as I went along. I could see how great the Bully II was, because even with my very basic crawler skills it was making most of the obstacles. John told me to try the dig. To be honest I had completely forgot about it. I hit the slider button on the front of the transmitter and the rear tyres locked. This allows the Bully II to turn by pivoting on its axis, with the front tyres moving and the rear tyres locked in position. It makes for very tight turns and the ability to position the rig accurately ready for your next obstacle or gate. Using the dig you can take approaches to gates that a non dig enabled rig wouldn’t ever attempt.

You can also lock just the front tyres and power it with the back ones and have a front dig. This actually helps get up almost impossible looking ledges as you can lock the front wheels in place holding onto the ledge as the rear wheels push the rig upwards and load the chassis almost like a spring. Then at just the right moment you start the front wheels drivi9ng again and it often magically lifts itself up onto the ledge. You  Just simply select which dig you want to use via the 3-position switch.

I decided to hand it over to the old pros and really see what it could do. I wasn’t disappointed. These boys know how to crawl and made my efforts look childish. I couldn’t wait to try it out at the old stomping grounds the next day. You see, Bracken Rock was home to the Crawler Nationals for many years. But when Comp Crawling started to get taken a bit too serious, the fun-loving group decided to switch over to Scale. That’s why we now have the Scaler Nationals there! I charged a couple batteries for the next day had another drink and went to bed thinking about the Bully on the rocks!

Learning To Dig Real Crawling

Next day was the UK Scaler Nationals. We got there early, briefed the drivers made sure they all knew where they were going and headed out to the trails. This year I was judging course three and decided it would be a great place to run the Bully. So after about 6 hours of scoring the course it finally started to slow down a bit. I went and asked my favourite photographer (Twinset) to do a shoot for me. He was happy to oblige and we headed out to the rocks.

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Tyres are a very stick, soft compound with micro block type tread. They grip amazingly well on most dry rock, or hard surfaces, only really suffering in damp and mossy areas

One thing very different from John’s home course was mud, grass and water. I was hoping the Bully Comp Tyres would do ok on the added elements. They were definitely soft and had a great tread for dry rocks, but I was a bit concerned about the wet. I sat off onto the marked trail. 10 gates set out for 1.9 and 2.2 scalers. In theory it should be relatively easy for the Bully. The first gate was easy enough. The second was a tight left turn around some rocks. I selected the dig and easily went right around it. The next gate was up a double rock that was a bit steep. I drove the front tyres onto it and noticed it kept trying to wheelie, which would have obviously flipped the rig on its back. Then I decided to use dig again. I locked the back tyres and drug them up the steep face of the rock with just the power of the front wheels. That was really cool looking by the way. I could get used to this crawling thing!

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The Bully II handles anything you throw at it, and mastering its true abilities is a joy

Gate 4 would really test the tyres as it was a side hill. The Bully creeped across the rock face without any slippage and no problems! Gate five was a drop down that you had to climb up to. The climb was a deep V shaped area between two rocks. The Bully had no problem making up the surface and then I used dig to pull myself round to the drop won. Doing the drop down, the drag brake held flawlessly. We even left it there for a few minutes as Twinset got some great pics of it.

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The tyres hook up on most surfaces, but perform much better in the dry

Gate 6 was a quick up and over. It was a log that proved to be difficult for some scale rigs, but was just a speed bump to the Bully. Gates 7 and 8 were just two off camber inclines that were no match for the MOA rig. Gate 9 had some tall grass on the sides that I found wrapped around my axles, but I made it through the gates.

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This log was breezed up and over….no ‘Clod Stall’ or issues

Gate 10 would be the only gate I couldn’t finish. It was a steep, slick incline that nearly everyone that made it through had to use a winch. I obviously didn’t have a winch, but I could have definitely benefited from some axle weights here!

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THis is about as extreme as it gets…With a little more front weight bias, it would make it

Overall I am very, very impressed with this rig! I had a blast with it and learned a lot about driving as well. The included dig was a huge bonus that really opened up some options on the course! So now for the pros and Cons

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Off camber sections and side hilling is also easy to tackle, the very low GOG helping immensly

Pros

  • Front & Rear Dig function, Drag Brakes and Twin ESC
  • Tough Steel Internal Heavy Duty Gears
  • Lightweight Carbon Fibre and Delrin Wheels
  • Bully 2.2″ Competition Tires (Advanced X2SS Compound)
  • High Clearance Titanium Links
  • 10 Model Memory 2.4 GHz 3-Channel Tx
  • Carbon Fibre TVP Chassis
  • It’s A RTR (Just needs main pack)
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Letting the rig ‘Relax’ into the surface is the best option, slow and steady the mantra

Cons

  • Servo was a bit weak considering loads placed on it in use. It worked, and I got through the course, but I think it would definitely benefit from a more powerful servo and 10 or 20A BEC
  • The wire routing to motors was a bit of a concern. But this was easily remedied. My concern is someone new to crawling or RC in general may overlook it. This could result in a broken or shorted wire…
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Drop offs are also easy as long as you remember when to gun the throttle and when to let the drag brakes do their thing

Final MOA Thoughts

Great product! The servo was a bit of a let-down as a seasoned RC guy, but in the end, it is RTR so if you knew no better, in most situations it actually wouldn’t bother you that much! At extremes of lock or axle articulation it can get stuck in one position without the physical power to move itself back to where you want it to go.

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The most fun i’ve had driving a rig slowly since I started in RC

The wires and their routing to the motors were just a quick fix so that’s not too bad. But the Pros outweigh the Cons tenfold! I could have talked for days about the pros, but I left it to the few above that are the key points. Having both front a rear dig is a great tool when out on a comp course, or just crawling for fun! It is the first rig I have ever had that has this feature, and after using it, it definitely won’t be the last! All in all you need one of these! I would love to see Comp Crawling make a comeback. It became a competition of who had more money last time and that’s what killed it! Companies got to money hungry and started rigs were quickly entering the multiple thousand-pound range as they were being modified. But I believe RC4WD got it right and offer a great comp crawler ready to go for well under £1000!

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Even letting a wheel hang between rocks is possible…then using the front axle only to generate grip and grad the rear up and over the gap

Get yourself a Bully II and let’s make Comp Crawling Great Again!

Available Globally: HERE Current Price: $589.99 or in UK: HERE

Forget Throttle & Steer…Try Throttle, Yaw & Roll!

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Kyosho’s 1/18th G-Zero ‘Drone Racer’

Kyosho Main Page: HERE

Available in the UK: HERE

UK RRP: £249.99  Available: Late November

SPEC: Length: 302mm (with guard), Width; 300mm (with guard), Height; 65mm, Gear Ratio: 5 : 1, Weight: 130g approx, Motor: 8.5mm coreless, Battery: 3.7V-1000mAh, Propeller: 5”, Flight Time: 10 Minutes/Variable, Charging Time: 1-2 hours (depending on 5v USB Amp Output), Speed: 30km/h approx. (normal specification)/34.5km/h approx. (with 20° propeller angle setting)/38km/h approx. (when using optional parts), Flight altitude: Low 35cm/High 60cm approx. (setting can be changed using software application).

Fly-Drive-Race

As someone that’s heavily into both Multirotor and RC cars I was intrigued to learn on the RC grapevine a few months back that Kyosho were releasing a product they called the ‘Drone Racer’. Early images of it showed a very futuristic and yet thin side profile. It was very reminiscent of craft seen in the classic PlayStation game Wipe-out, or an evolution of a Formula E race car crossed with one of the Pod Racers seen in the Phantom Menace.

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Part futuristic F1 car, part Pod Racer…Wipeout was a big influence I’m convinced

The initial reaction from the core Kyosho fans, and strangely the car community was very positive. The existing Drone Racing community didn’t seem to get it, and some even ridiculed it initially, but then this wasn’t a Drone Racer in that sense at all. In fact, the biggest shock and polariser of the whole concept was the steering wheel car type, surface remote. That got more questions of “How?” on social media than any other part.

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The body/cowling makes a huge difference to the overall look…

Then things went very quiet for a while until the 23rd of September at a Drone Racer recital at the Japan Model Hobby Show. A buddy of mine Francesco attended and I watched transfixed as four of these craft raced their way around a course at the show, streaming live on his Facebook page. My interest level went through the roof, so I immediately got onto Kyosho UK and arranged this review. The actual retail stock looks to be hitting the UK in late November, so perfect timing for Xmas for anyone stuck what to get themselves, or a RC/Drone/Tech lover (delete as appropriate) for Xmas.

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Without the shell, the airframe is pretty sleek and narrow

Even More Torment!

Just before the sample physically arrived, just to torment me further, Kyosho released this YouTube video:

I wanted to review one even more! Then thankfully the door bell went, and a box arrived by courier. Just inside the box was a note saying I had just a few days with the sample, as it was one of only two in the UK and was needed by the UK reps to show retailers, I shelved anything I had to do in the next 48 hours and quickly finished unboxed the Drone Racer.

You can see my first thoughts after the unboxing on a Facebook video: HERE

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That rear spoiler is more cosmetic than to achieve any downforce, but who cares! it looks cool!

The drone itself is very light and sits at just over 300mm x 300mm. The Lexan body looks like a futuristic f1 car and really suits the genre of product. I’ve been a big advocator of body shells on drones as the standard ‘White for a filming platform’ and ‘Naked Carbon Fibre with alloy standoffs’’ for a race drone is starting to look a little old hat of late.

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The prop guards are necessary items. They will protect the props in use and ensure many flight hours before needing replacement

The drones H chassis design is only about 35mm or so wide along its spine, with a Sonar sensor array and battery holder on the underside, and on the top a 5v out accessory port (For a future FPV Cam possibly?), an LED port (for additional LEDs I’m guessing) and Infra Red Sensor (for a lap timing system and app Kyosho will be selling soon), standard mini USB port, a Bind and then clickable ‘C’ and ‘A’ buttons.

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An array of ports adorn the upper surface of the airframe. From bind and function buttons, to Infra Red and USB

Indicate & Identify

Both sets of arms have RGB LED strips built into them, and these can be changed at the front to any one of six colours (White, Blue, Yellow, Green, Pink or Blue) to help identify your drone if you intend to race it.

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The arms LEDs offer an indication of the Drones status…with bright front and rear LEDs mimicking headlamps and tail light

On the rear arm they change automatically to any one of four colours to indicate the drones status. This is simple to understand and the colour codes are as follows:-

  • Red : flashing = Low Voltage Warning, Solid Red indicates safety function is released and the quad is now armed and ready. Once flying the LED’s remain on to act as a tail light.
  • Yellow : Indicates the transmitter is not connected , so quad goes into failsafe/Emergency stop mode.
  • Green: Flashing indicates drone detecting horizontal axis, when solidly lit it indicates the drone is ready but safety function is still Active
  • Blue : Solid blue means Gyro calibration in progress
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Visibility in the dark indoors or out will never be an issue…

0, 10 or 20 Degrees Of Tilt

The arms also can be tilted to any one of three locked angles via the use of additional (but supplied) arm holders. These upper clamps hold the arms at either a 0-degree, 10-degree or 20-degree attack angle. Kyosho call it ‘VPUS’ or Variable Propeller Unit Structure. Marketing jargon aside, what this does is increase the forward speed of the quad in flight as the props are already pulling the craft forward because of the angle. Set at 20-degrees it jumps from the stock 30km/h at 0 degrees, to just under 35km/h and it also has an added advantage of flying better if there’s a slight breeze too. It tends to be able to cut through it better, rather than being blown off track (as can happen at the 0-degree setting).

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The props are easily replaced as is the motor, gears or prop guard

To seasoned quad racers this speed isn’t going to be mind-bendingly fast, but to most RC fans, especially the more car orientated, it’s a fast enough pace to have a good old race at, and more importantly, to have lots of fun with!

Charging…Charging…

The 1s (3.7v) 1000mAh LiPo included in this retail package takes between 1 and 2hrs to charge, all dependent upon the ampere rating of the USB socket you plug the included charger into. Now most PC’s offer quite a low Amp rating, so I opted to use a USB wall plug I had spare, rated at 2A and 5v, this peaked the pack in under an hour. As a rule of thumb, if using a computers USB port, USB 1.0 and 2.0 ports can deliver up to 0.5A; with USB 3.0, that moves up to 0.9A. By using a dedicated charging wall plug like I did, you can expect anywhere between 1.5A and 3A, drastically improving charge times.

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Included are spare props, a USB lead and USB charger for the 1S pack

By charging at 2A this gave a good ten minutes of mixed throttle fly/drive/hover time, and I’m sure that will improve once the battery has had a few cycles. The battery is a long flat, oblong and slightly wider than many fitted to other quads in the fun sector of the market. I have other packs with the same lead fitted, but all were a different size and lower mAh rating. This means that unless you can source a direct comparative cell by a third-party manufacturer, you will have to purchase official Kyosho spares, if you want multiple cells to enhance your fun.

“A Steering Wheel, But It’s A Drone?”

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Yes it’s a steer wheel, get over it! this is a Hybrid vehicle if ever there was one

Now, that was the reaction I got from most of my Drone flying buddies when I first revealed the Kyosho to them. They simply didn’t get it. All are used to flying stick radios. All use pitch and roll in combination to get the type turns they require. How could a wheel transmitter offer the same kind of control? Well…to put it bluntly. It doesn’t.

In use, the Drone Racer is more like piloting a very sophisticated Drift Car/Hovercraft hybrid than a Quadcopter, and for its intended market, that’s not actually a bad thing. The electronics built into the flight controller mix Yaw and Roll together and as you twist the wheel, the craft turns, offering quite a flat almost drift like Yaw turn, but with a small amount of roll mixed in. You can adjust the speed and amount of turn in relationship to the users input using the rotary knobs on the Tx, as can you trim each channel to offer a neutral point for the Yaw/Roll function and the throttle. Both important if there seems to be any slight drifting on any axis while in a straight, on the spot hover.

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Adjustment of trim, rate and feel during flight/hover/driving is all via the Tx

You must remember however that this Quads built in sensors are for Height Hold only. Two Sonar sensors pointing down help maintain one of the two available pre-set heights you select via the transmitters 3 position thumb switch on the grip. The other position being to land the Drone! At a moderate pace, they react fast enough to lift the drone up over an object, so on say a 1/10th Off Road track you can see the Drone rise in relation to the up ramp of a jump, then settle back to a constant height after the Drone descends the down ramp, or clears it completely.

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The Syncro Tx looks almost as futuristic as the Drone Racer itself!

Go too fast however and there’s a chance the Drone will hit the object before its sensors have compensated for its height. That’s when I found the highest of its two settings is best for this type of terrain. On a flat or semi-undulating terrain go to height one and everything’s smooth as butter. The Drone will compensate for small changes in surface seamlessly. Over rough terrain or where there is a series of objects much higher than the Drone is travelling, the second height is king.

A Fleet Of These Racing = Wipeout 2017

The best analogy I can use for the Kyosho Drones racer and its look and feel when being piloted is the game ‘Wipeout’. Now for this not familiar with the Sony PlayStation gaming franchise. Wipeout and the driving game Ridge Racer where two of the seminal launch titles on the original PS1. Wipeout captured the imagination of gamers by combining futuristic hovering race craft, with pumping electronic music and sweeping almost Tron-Esq tracks. Now Kyosho must have had a design brief of some sort when the project was first initiated, and I’m thinking that this and possibly the Pod Racers from Start Wars Episode 1 were high on that influences list. Sprinkle in a touch of Formula E, the latest in fun quadcopter technology and an easy to use (and futuristic looking) Synchro Steer Wheel transmitter, and you have one of the coolest bits of Xmas 2016 hobby tech I’ve seen in a long while.

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Note the wide 1000 mAh 1S LiPo and the two Sonar Sensors on the crafts belly

Seeing a small fleet of these, all set to display different colours battling it out would be epic. It’s the perfect stock class vehicle for an after-school club, held in a school gym or as I’ve recently seen at a more traditional 1/10th, On or Off Road RC Car club track.

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Kyosho sell two body variants to fit on this airframe…but expect more

Yes, You Can Run Outdoors…But

In totally stock form, and with the arms flat, any cross winds are hard to fight, and tend to push the craft off course. At slow speeds this is something you can counteract easily, but if the wind picks up, just making any headway can be a struggle, and if you are travelling at the crafts top speed, its momentum tends to make it carry for quite a distance.  And this is how the Drone Racer flies, its best described at Point, Squirt and Drift. You use the throttle and steer wheel in conjunction with each other to set the radius as you travel around an actual or imaginary corner marker.

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Sleek and aerodynamic…Inspirational in the Air

You soon get used to how much speed the Drone Racer can carry if you don’t counteract it with either a tap of the brakes (by pushing forwards on the trigger), or in my case when things looked like I may hit an object you gab a full on handful of brake, reversing the motors and causing the Racer to first slow, then stop, then start moving backwards.

When you first take off you flick the three position switch up to the desired level, pull on the trigger to initiate forward momentum, reach the desired speed and then use the throttle to help keep the Drone Racer pointed where you want it to go, modulating the speed with throttle and brake just like an RC car.

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Nore the Red LED’s…that’s what your opposition will see lots of hopefully if you get to race one!

At one point during an outdoor run I ended up with it travelling backwards, at speed heading into a fence. The wind had really picked up and just kept pushing it and even though I was gunning the throttle it just couldn’t fight the wind. Once I tilted the arms forwards however, things got far more aggressive in the handling stakes and the Racer tended to cut through wind moving forwards far better, and didn’t get pushed off course as easily.

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The ams need tilting to fly in any kind of windy conditions, thankfully its was still during most of my testing

On a still day or in a sheltered area outdoors the Drone Racer is lots of fun. It’s just a magnet for people and drew a crowd everywhere I took it, with it flying so low to the ground, excited the big kid in anyone that sees it. Its body shell is a key factor in this. Drones have become part of the everyday fabric of life. But seeing something so futuristic and sleek elevated this product from just 4 sets of blades and a blob of plastic, to something very much more inspiring to pilot or more importantly, observe being piloted.

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The must have piece of RC tech for Xmas 2016…I think so, it’s firmly on my list!

I offered the controls to everyone within my RC peer group that wanted to have a go, admittedly mostly are car guys, but even though this was one of only two sample I knew of outside Japan, I even let a couple of complete RC novice buddies have a go. With the height, it travels, the prop guards, the relatively low RPM the blades spin, and the built-in motor cut out programming, I knew that it was safe to be around. you can’t say that about many drones that aren’t 100% toy grade.

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To some it may look Toy Grade, but once you experience the Drone Racer , you realise its Hobby Grade all the way!

All who experienced it gave the Drone Racer a unanimous thumbs-up for simply being so innovative and different, with only one finding the steer wheel method “a little odd”, but then again he also flies planes and quads, and is a stick man when racing cars too…so there’s no hope for him! If it encourages people into the very diverse and interesting world of Drones now that can’t be a bad thing. I hate to use the term, but this is a gateway product if I ever saw one!

Conclusion…

The Kyosho Drone Racer is a product that to some may initially look like its Toy Grade, but when you consider the build quality, its price point (£249.99), the technology involved in its realisation and its future potential with the Kyosho timing app and additional future performance upgrades, it’s definitely Hobby-Grade through and through. Drone purists probably won’t get it, buy it or race one, and that leaves it open for the rest of the Tech and RC communities to embrace, and that’s a huge market place globally. Judging by the pre-orders the first batch into Europe will sell out fast, and I’ve got one on my Xmas list for sure.

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All that piloted the Drone Racer wanted one. Thats a great compliment for any new product

I just can’t wait to see what Kyosho have up their sleeve next. I hope more variants on the Drone Racer, perhaps a Pro Drone Racer with 2S support, faster motors and FPV? I live in hope…but for the latter I have a confession to make. I have tried it with FPV and its ace fun! I simply used one of the tiny 25mw CE legal AIO 5.8ghz FPV cams we all use on our Tiny Whoop builds, plugged it into the 5V port (the cam takes up to 5v!) and although it reduced the overall flight time slightly, as there’s an additional current draw…it was a very good way to pilot the Drone Racer. In fact, as an entry into the world of FPV, the Kyosho is a great platform. The flight time it offers, and its ability to fly indoors if space allows or outdoors if the winds not too prevalent, make it near perfect.

Final Thought: I would hope that Kyosho will offer a stick version to at some point, even keep in the mixing of Yaw and Roll and just allow throttle and steering, as that would excite even more people about its low flying charms. We shall see…

Huge shout out to Neil Skull and the Kysoho UK team for this opportunity and I can’t wait to get together with a few owners post Xmas and put the Drone Racers through their paces on a track somewhere!

For more on the Kyosho Drone Racer click HERE