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RC4WD Bully II MOA RTR Competition Crawler

Words & Images: Scott ‘AceofAxe’ Curlin & Andy ‘Twinset’ Moore
Available Globally: HERE or in UK: HERE
Current Price: $589.99
Spec
  • CNC Machined Alloy Axles
  • MOA (Motor On Axle)
  • Wheelbase: 317mm
  • Width: 254mm
  • Height: 182mm
  • Ground Clearance: 92mm
  • Final Drive Ratio: 40.7 : 1
  • Weight: 1.99Kg
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The MOA Comp Crawler is back!…Introducing the Bully II

Prologue…

In 2010 while I was on “Holiday” in a very hot and sandy place, a buddy of mine ordered a comp crawler. When it came in he brought it to my attention as he knew I was an RC guy. I was just starting to look at the crawler and scale scene, but was still busy trying to make everything I owned go faster, and survive bigger, and bigger jumps. I was a basher through and through and didn’t have time for any other aspects of the RC car world. Sure, I have always loved racing but didn’t have a proper place to do that at the time. So, I focused on making my bashers faster and stronger. Then he brings this crawler to my attention. At first I was stubborn and said why in the world would you want to crawl when you can jump? But he convinced me to watch him on some rocks we had at work. I was interested in the articulation it had going over the obstacles he ran up and over, and was intrigued with its ability to get over some of the bigger rocks. He then handed me the transmitter and I set off on my first crawl. I was immediately hooked and needed one of my own. So, after that I went inside and started to look into my options. I saw the one he had, but thought I should get something different. I ordered a cheapish RTR and waited, and waited…(It took quite a while to get mail where we were).

Bad Move

By the time it came in I had found something else shiny and had changed my mind on crawlers. But it was there, and I wanted to at least try it. I took it out of the box and immediately noticed a lot of plastic on it. It didn’t look very bulletproof to me. But, I loaded in the batteries and gave it a go. I turned it on, tried driving up a wall and over a few objects, I very quickly decided it needed to go back. I had bought a crawler that looked cool, but couldn’t crawl very well. I boxed it up and sent it back. The car I replaced it with help me to launch my YouTube channel so it wasn’t all bad…but that was it for owning a true crawler for a while.

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Scale has been my thing for a while now…Here I am with Mr Brian parker himself at the 2016 UK RECON G6

Once I returned home, eventually I got into the scale scene and started to regret letting that crawler go, but everything happens for a reason. I bought one other shafty crawler after that, but I quickly converted it to a scale rig and that ended me owning a real crawler once more. I met Peter Gray and the RCCar.Zone (Formerly RRCi) team in 2010 and have been introduced to many other forms of this great hobby and have gained an appreciation for each one. But I always said I want another, true crawler, I felt like I was really missing out on something.

FFWD To 2016

Pete, being the mate he is, remembered my interest in a owning a ‘real’ crawler. He rang me up recently and said he had a RTR that needed to be reviewed. It was even a Motor on Axle (MOA) design, so something I wanted to run even more. Knowing how this aspect of the market had almost disappeared of late, I thought was it was probably a cheaper brand that would be shockingly bad and resemble something from the toy section of your local grocery store. He assured me however it was (and I quote) “Pure Quality” and I should wait before passing judgement…so I did!

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MOA rigs have been neglected for too long, now RC4WD offer us an affordable, complete solution

I turned up to his house a couple weeks later and saw the normal stash of incoming reviews in the hallway. The only crawler I could see was an RC4WD one. This couldn’t be it? Do they even do a Comp crawler anymore? The answer was yes, and it was mine to review! After a quick look at the box I learned a bit more about it. The RC4WD Bully II is a MOA RTR, its the second generation of the Bully MOA rig that Pete himself reviewed many years back, and that he put on the cover of the RRCi Crawler Special he wrote back in the day.

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The dimensions of the rig at a glance…

He was handing me the responsibility of both reviewing this rig, and also trying to help with my ongoing learning curve of all things RC. A MOA is something I had never run before, and learning about its nuances and the very different driving style required would be very interesting.

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Having never owned or run a rig of this calibre…I was intrigued at its abilities

Being MOA it means that each axle drives independently, so they can be Front only driven, rear only driven and by letting the drag brake keep the un driven axle locked up completely, they act as a front or rear dig. All this functionality can be easily controlled with the included 3-channel transmitter. As a one box solution its a great way onto MOA rigs and much cheaper than actually buying the components separately and building your own. I couldn’t wait to get this home and get it out of the box!

The Box Art Sets The Scene

Once I got back home, I took the box into the office and immediately opened it. But not before truly admiring the box art. The picture on the box is a great shot of the Bully II on the rocks. It truly inspires you to get it out of the box and on to the rocks as soon as! When you see this box in store with all the other boxes, it completely stands out. A lot of other companies have static pictures of their kits. Whether sat in a black background or on a track somewhere. But this shows it in its natural environment and truly makes you want to discover new lands with it! On the side of the box there are listed some of the official RC4WD hop ups for it, and even more great photos of it on the rocks! The exterior of the box is just loaded with Hi-res pics that make you want to charge a battery and hit the rocks!

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Great Promo Images from RC4WD…they make me want to hit the rocks straight away!

Once open, the rig comes out on a sliding cardboard stand as most of us are used to. The transmitter is securely fastened beneath the rig and inset into the base. The manual and spare parts are located under the cardboard base. The manual is a picture based manual, as we have come to know and love from RC4WD. The spares contain a battery strap, optional springs for the shocks and some flat bits of Lexan. I was wondering what the Lexan was for until I noticed they were body panels. These are easily attached to the Bully if you want to add a bit of colour to it. They are also ready to be painted with a protective sheeting on one side just like the normal shells you are used to. I opted to paint mine red as a contrast to my normal Blue?Green I tend use on everything I race.

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Note the elongated Delrin skid and high clearance Titanium links

The transmitter was one of the biggest surprises for me. It’s the new XR4 4 channel radio. I have never had a RTR radio with 10 model memory! You can buy relatively cheap receivers for your other kits and control them with this radio!

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10 Model memory, LCD Screen, 3-Channel…great spec for a RTR 2.4Ghz TX

The radio has all the trimmings (see what I did there) that you will find on the high dollar competitors. It also allows you to name each model with its 3-digit display. For this one I named it MOA, that way I know which rig is on memory one. There’s a backlit LED display screen that makes selecting all the functions a dream. But enough about the transmitter let’s talk about the Bully II!

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Articulation is the keyword in Crawling…and the Bully II has it, and then some!

Serious Stuff

Straight away the high clearance lower arms let you know this is a serious comp rig! The carbon fibre Twin Vertical Plates (TVP) look almost as good as they perform! When you want light weight and strength, it’s hard to beat Carbon Fibre! The twin Boost 35t rebuildable motors are exactly what I would put on a crawler kit if I was building one, so that was a nice choice by RC4WD, in my case at least.

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The included 6V 5A Turbo BEC is fine for the supplied steering servo, but go any higher spec and you will need to upgrade

The 6v – 5 Amp BEC is a great choice as well! I run one of those on my RC4WD Beast II and it performs flawlessly! The RC4WD Outcry Brushed Speed Controller with built-in drag brake is the perfect speedo for this rig and simply gets the job done!

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The twin motor ESC allows you to drive each axle independently, so front and rear dig functions are possible

When coupled with the included Rocker Electronic Dig/ESCit proves to be an almost unstoppable combination! The servo is the Twister Metal Gear Digital Servo that is rated at 153oz @ 6v. It seems kind of low for a comp crawler, but it is a RTR and it must work or it wouldn’t be in the kit. But the rocks will reveal all!

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The classic COG test of any comp rig…Not amazingly scientific, but looks coll nevertheless

The only thing I did notice on the Bully was the routing of the motor wires. The front motor wires ran down the lower links and attached to the bottom of the motor. I was a bit concerned as I knew these areas were very open to abuse from the rocks. I quickly re-routed them and plugged the motor wires into the top plugs out of the way. But enough of all this tech talk it’s time to hit the rocks.

I headed up to Derbyshire for our RCCar.Zone Scaler Nationals. I took along the Bully and was planning on testing it at our comp site in Bracken rocks. The night before we were at John Wasley’s house having a drink or more and they all got talking about the glory days of comp crawlers and how I had missed it. They knew I had the Bully with me and were basically setting me up for a trial run on John’s rock garden course. I immediately agreed and we were off to the garden…well I say immediately, I needed to find a suitable 2S LiPo first to fit on the tiny plinth on the front axle, next to the steering servo.

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the steering servo sits on the front axle and is offset to allow a small LiPo to be placed next to it
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Note that rear clearance. Thats why its important to tuck away those motor wires to avoid them being damaged

I was the first one to drive it of course, and I was really enjoying it. John along with Twinset and Pete were giving me tips as I went along. I could see how great the Bully II was, because even with my very basic crawler skills it was making most of the obstacles. John told me to try the dig. To be honest I had completely forgot about it. I hit the slider button on the front of the transmitter and the rear tyres locked. This allows the Bully II to turn by pivoting on its axis, with the front tyres moving and the rear tyres locked in position. It makes for very tight turns and the ability to position the rig accurately ready for your next obstacle or gate. Using the dig you can take approaches to gates that a non dig enabled rig wouldn’t ever attempt.

You can also lock just the front tyres and power it with the back ones and have a front dig. This actually helps get up almost impossible looking ledges as you can lock the front wheels in place holding onto the ledge as the rear wheels push the rig upwards and load the chassis almost like a spring. Then at just the right moment you start the front wheels drivi9ng again and it often magically lifts itself up onto the ledge. You  Just simply select which dig you want to use via the 3-position switch.

I decided to hand it over to the old pros and really see what it could do. I wasn’t disappointed. These boys know how to crawl and made my efforts look childish. I couldn’t wait to try it out at the old stomping grounds the next day. You see, Bracken Rock was home to the Crawler Nationals for many years. But when Comp Crawling started to get taken a bit too serious, the fun-loving group decided to switch over to Scale. That’s why we now have the Scaler Nationals there! I charged a couple batteries for the next day had another drink and went to bed thinking about the Bully on the rocks!

Learning To Dig Real Crawling

Next day was the UK Scaler Nationals. We got there early, briefed the drivers made sure they all knew where they were going and headed out to the trails. This year I was judging course three and decided it would be a great place to run the Bully. So after about 6 hours of scoring the course it finally started to slow down a bit. I went and asked my favourite photographer (Twinset) to do a shoot for me. He was happy to oblige and we headed out to the rocks.

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Tyres are a very stick, soft compound with micro block type tread. They grip amazingly well on most dry rock, or hard surfaces, only really suffering in damp and mossy areas

One thing very different from John’s home course was mud, grass and water. I was hoping the Bully Comp Tyres would do ok on the added elements. They were definitely soft and had a great tread for dry rocks, but I was a bit concerned about the wet. I sat off onto the marked trail. 10 gates set out for 1.9 and 2.2 scalers. In theory it should be relatively easy for the Bully. The first gate was easy enough. The second was a tight left turn around some rocks. I selected the dig and easily went right around it. The next gate was up a double rock that was a bit steep. I drove the front tyres onto it and noticed it kept trying to wheelie, which would have obviously flipped the rig on its back. Then I decided to use dig again. I locked the back tyres and drug them up the steep face of the rock with just the power of the front wheels. That was really cool looking by the way. I could get used to this crawling thing!

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The Bully II handles anything you throw at it, and mastering its true abilities is a joy

Gate 4 would really test the tyres as it was a side hill. The Bully creeped across the rock face without any slippage and no problems! Gate five was a drop down that you had to climb up to. The climb was a deep V shaped area between two rocks. The Bully had no problem making up the surface and then I used dig to pull myself round to the drop won. Doing the drop down, the drag brake held flawlessly. We even left it there for a few minutes as Twinset got some great pics of it.

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The tyres hook up on most surfaces, but perform much better in the dry

Gate 6 was a quick up and over. It was a log that proved to be difficult for some scale rigs, but was just a speed bump to the Bully. Gates 7 and 8 were just two off camber inclines that were no match for the MOA rig. Gate 9 had some tall grass on the sides that I found wrapped around my axles, but I made it through the gates.

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This log was breezed up and over….no ‘Clod Stall’ or issues

Gate 10 would be the only gate I couldn’t finish. It was a steep, slick incline that nearly everyone that made it through had to use a winch. I obviously didn’t have a winch, but I could have definitely benefited from some axle weights here!

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THis is about as extreme as it gets…With a little more front weight bias, it would make it

Overall I am very, very impressed with this rig! I had a blast with it and learned a lot about driving as well. The included dig was a huge bonus that really opened up some options on the course! So now for the pros and Cons

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Off camber sections and side hilling is also easy to tackle, the very low GOG helping immensly

Pros

  • Front & Rear Dig function, Drag Brakes and Twin ESC
  • Tough Steel Internal Heavy Duty Gears
  • Lightweight Carbon Fibre and Delrin Wheels
  • Bully 2.2″ Competition Tires (Advanced X2SS Compound)
  • High Clearance Titanium Links
  • 10 Model Memory 2.4 GHz 3-Channel Tx
  • Carbon Fibre TVP Chassis
  • It’s A RTR (Just needs main pack)
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Letting the rig ‘Relax’ into the surface is the best option, slow and steady the mantra

Cons

  • Servo was a bit weak considering loads placed on it in use. It worked, and I got through the course, but I think it would definitely benefit from a more powerful servo and 10 or 20A BEC
  • The wire routing to motors was a bit of a concern. But this was easily remedied. My concern is someone new to crawling or RC in general may overlook it. This could result in a broken or shorted wire…
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Drop offs are also easy as long as you remember when to gun the throttle and when to let the drag brakes do their thing

Final MOA Thoughts

Great product! The servo was a bit of a let-down as a seasoned RC guy, but in the end, it is RTR so if you knew no better, in most situations it actually wouldn’t bother you that much! At extremes of lock or axle articulation it can get stuck in one position without the physical power to move itself back to where you want it to go.

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The most fun i’ve had driving a rig slowly since I started in RC

The wires and their routing to the motors were just a quick fix so that’s not too bad. But the Pros outweigh the Cons tenfold! I could have talked for days about the pros, but I left it to the few above that are the key points. Having both front a rear dig is a great tool when out on a comp course, or just crawling for fun! It is the first rig I have ever had that has this feature, and after using it, it definitely won’t be the last! All in all you need one of these! I would love to see Comp Crawling make a comeback. It became a competition of who had more money last time and that’s what killed it! Companies got to money hungry and started rigs were quickly entering the multiple thousand-pound range as they were being modified. But I believe RC4WD got it right and offer a great comp crawler ready to go for well under £1000!

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Even letting a wheel hang between rocks is possible…then using the front axle only to generate grip and grad the rear up and over the gap

Get yourself a Bully II and let’s make Comp Crawling Great Again!

Available Globally: HERE Current Price: $589.99 or in UK: HERE

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